Arts & Entertainment

Richmond Art Center celebrates Dia de los Muertos ‘to educate people about such an important cultural event.’

Amid the drug store offerings of Halloween consumer goods, any Dia de los Muertos-themed item invariably sticks out. Decorations featuring iconic skulls and cempasúchil marigolds, or candy branded with characters from Pixar’s film “Coco” speak to the growing commercialization of a holiday once outside of the corporate limelight. But the holiday has more cultural significance in Mexico, where it orginated. And on Saturday, the Richmond Art Center will share that tradition with a Dia de los Muertos-themed Fall Family Day,…

About 100 players to compete at Richmond chess festival, as more kids take up game

On a Sunday afternoon in late September, TC Ball entered Richmond’s Multicultural Bookstore with a cart full of kings, queens, bishops, rooks, knights, and pawns and boards to start the first of several chess classes for children. “Cool people play chess,” said Ball, 69, founder and director of the West Coast Chess Alliance in Richmond, as he prepared to start the class.  He fell in love with chess about 40 years ago when he was at college, and then 13…

Audience returns to Point Richmond Music Fest: ‘It’s very much a community event’

After a two-year absence due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the Point Richmond Music Festival was back in full swing this summer with an eclectic roster of artists playing everything from Bollywood pop to Louisiana zydeco. With Friday temperatures hovering at a pleasant 70 degrees, Park Place was packed from curb to curb for the year’s third and final performance, featuring Laurie Lewis and Andre Thierry. While enjoying the free music, attendees availed themselves of tacos from a local food truck,…

Richmond’s first Ferry Fest debuts this weekend with free cruises

With more bay shoreline than any other city in the Bay Area, it’s natural that Richmond has had a long association with ferries. Before the Bay Bridge was built, the ferry from Richmond to San Francisco was the most direct way to commute back and forth to the city.  Richmond’s original ferry service stopped in the 1950s, and besides a short-lived ferry in the 1990s, Richmond did not see another ferry until San Francisco Bay Ferry launched its Richmond Ferry…

Richmond Art Center opens doors to free event for Indigenous People’s Day

In honor of Indigenous People’s Day, the Richmond Art Center will host “Gathering in the Spirit of Gwarth-ee-lass,” a free event on Sunday featuring spoken word, candid conversations and live music, all in the backdrop of artist Rigo 23’s newest exhibit “Time and Again.” The exhibit’s centerpiece is a 12-foot sculpture created from a self-portrait of Native American political activist Leonard Peltier. Peltier has been in prison for about 45 years, serving two life sentences after his controversial conviction in…

Spirit & Soul Festival returns in person to Richmond

Live music, food, artists and vendors return to Richmond this weekend, with the 13th annual Spirit & Soul Festival. The annual ticketed event , hosted by the Richmond Main Street Initiative, celebrates the city’s arts and culture scene. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, it will be presented as a hybrid this year.  The free virtual broadcast will stream from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., with an in-person VIP Watch Party from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at El Garage, 1428…

VIDEO: At Richmond glassblowing studio, art is a Slow Burn

Bryan Goldenberg has been a glassblower for 27 years. He holds weekly classes for students of all experience levels in his new studio, Slow Burn Glass, in Richmond. In August, Richmond Confidential filmed one of Goldenberg’s classes and chatted with students. Some were inspired to take the class after watching the Netflix series “Blown Away,” which is about glass-blowing. Others said they were looking for a communal activity after a year of lockdown during the COVID-19 pandemic. For all, the…

Richmond art studio helps people with disabilities stay connected

The coronavirus pandemic has upset nearly every facet of life as we know it. But for Deshawna Kinard and other people with developmental disabilities, the closures and stay-at-home orders have posed some unique challenges. To stay connected, Kinard now logs onto Zoom to take part in her classes and other events offered by Nurturing Independence through Artistic Development (NIAD), which isn’t a typical art studio. Founded in 1982, NIAD combines an exhibition and studio space for artists with disabilities seeking…