For Halloween, how about some glass pumpkins

During October, Cohn-Stone Studios show glass pumpkins and glass blowing in their studio and garden.
glasspumpkin2Carved pumpkins with candles lit have been seen as a Halloween symbol for centuries. But have you ever thought of putting a twist on this tradition? Here at Cohn-Stone Studios in Richmond, you can find hundreds of glass pumpkins nestled in their garden–just like in the fairy tale Cinderella.
The Cohn-Stone Studios, a hand-blown glass studio, holds an open studio during three weekends in October to display and sell their work. During Halloween season, the pumpkin, is certainly the centerpiece.
The studio’s owners, Michael Cohn and Molly Stone, place hundreds of glass pumpkins in their triangle-shape garden. Visitors can select pumpkins they’d like to buy while wandering on the garden trail.
All of the pumpkins are made on site at Cohn-Stone’s studio. Visitors can see the whole process how those whimsical glass pumpkins are created—from start to finish.
On a recent Saturday, hundreds of visitors came to the studio. Some have been attending this annual event for several years—a few who drove from Southern California just to visit it.
“It’s beautiful. I have one at heart at my home. Everybody comments about it when they come to the house,” said Eloise Oretsky, who was selecting her second piece of glass pumpkin in the studio, “because it’s outstanding.”
Molly Stone has been blowing glass for 31 years. She came up with the idea of making glass pumpkins in 1990. Stone had been growing pumpkins during Halloween for years yet the weather that year ruined her tradition. Concerning that there might not be pumpkins for her daughter’s party, she made blown glass pumpkins and put them in the garden. Afterwards, the studio made this into a tradition and pumpkins become one of their most popular glass series.
Being a passionate gardener, Stone has found a perfect way to balance the gardening and glass blowing. Inspired by what she sees in the garden, she has made many series of natural fruits like potato, mushroom, apple, and acorn.
Michael Cohn, Stone’s husband and partner, who has blown glass for about 41 years, says the process of glass blowing fascinates him. “It’s kind of like a definitely a choreographed dance. It’s very fluent, “ he said, “I would think the finished piece as a record of all the moves of the dance. And then here it freezes.”
There are thousands of pieces of art glass in the Cohn-Stone gallery. And even Stone has no idea how many they have. The prices of the art glass range from $20 to $1,500.
The Cohn-Stone Studios have been holding the October event for about five years. Other than this, they also hold an open studio each spring to display their new artwork. Their work has been exhibited in many parts throughout the world.
However, most glass pumpkins buyers don’t want to risk putting them outside in the garden.
Sarah Venderveen, a visitor who has been collecting Cohn-Studio work for three years, said it was fascinating to see the glass pumpkins in the garden. “I wonder, could I do that at home? But when I get them home, I wanna keep them safe and sound and inside the house,” she said.
“There’s really nothing outside that can hurt them,” Stone said. “They’re good either way.”

Jack-o-lanterns have been a Halloween symbol for centuries. But have you ever thought about putting a twist on this tradition? At Cohn-Stone Studios in Richmond, you can find hundreds of glass pumpkins nestled in their garden that remind you of the pumpkin carriage in the fairy tale Cinderella.

Cohn-Stone Studios, a hand-blown glass studio, holds an open studio during three weekends in October to display and sell their work. During Halloween season, the pumpkin is the centerpiece of their displays.

Studio owners Michael Cohn and Molly Stone place hundreds of glass pumpkins in their triangle-shaped garden. Visitors can select pumpkins they’d like to buy while wandering on the garden trail.

All of the pumpkins are made on site at Cohn-Stone Studios. Visitors can see the process of how these whimsical glass pumpkins are created from start to finish.

On a recent Saturday, hundreds of visitors came to the studio. Some have been attending this annual event for several years—even a few who drove all the way from Southern California.

“It’s beautiful. I have one at my home. Everybody comments about it when they come to the house,” said Eloise Oretsky, “because it’s outstanding.” Oretsky was in the process of selecting her second glass pumpkin at the studio.

Molly Stone has been blowing glass for 31 years. She came up with the idea of making glass pumpkins in 1990. Stone had been growing pumpkins during Halloween for years, but the weather ruined her pumpkin patch that year. Concerned that there might not be any pumpkins available for her daughter’s party, she made blown glass pumpkins instead, and put them in the garden. Since then, the studio has made this into a yearly tradition, and the pumpkins have become one of their most popular series of hand-blown glass.

 Hundreds of glass pumpkins are displayed in Cohn-Stone Studios during their open-studio event in October.;

Hundreds of glass pumpkins are displayed in Cohn-Stone Studios during their open-studio event in October.

Being a passionate gardener, Stone has found a perfect way to balance gardening and glass blowing. Inspired by what she sees in the garden, she has created glass potatoes, mushrooms, apples, and acorns. All are on display at the studio.

Michael Cohn, Stone’s husband and business partner, has blown glass for about 41 years. He says the process fascinates him. “It’s kind of like a definitely choreographed dance. It’s very fluent, “ he said. “I would think the finished piece as a record of all the moves of the dance. And then here it freezes.”

There are thousands of pieces of art glass in the Cohn-Stone gallery. Prices range from $20 to $1,500.

Cohn and Stone have been holding the October event for about five years. In addition, they also hold an open studio each spring to display new artwork. Their work has been exhibited in many parts throughout the world.

Most people who buy the glass pumpkins don’t want to risk putting them outside in their garden.

Sarah Venderveen, a visitor who has been collecting Cohn-Studio work for three years, said it was fascinating to see the glass pumpkins in the garden setting. “I wonder, could I do that at home? But when I get them home, I want to keep them safe and sound and inside the house,” she said.

“There’s really nothing outside that can hurt them,” Stone said of the glass pumpkins. “They’re good either way.”

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